You know what I don't understand? A lot of things really, but specifically right now I don't understand how and why the President pardons hundreds of criminals. President Obama has commuted more people than the previous 12 presidents - combined! In fact a White House press release states that he's commuted the sentences of 1,385 people.

I know he's the President but does he really have the power to pardon criminals that have been otherwise found guilty by a jury of their peers? I also know that the forgiven criminals are not just drawn out of a hat and have proved in some way that this second chance they are getting will not be wasted. But, even if that is within his power - why would he do that? I may sound extremely ignorant and there is probably a really good reason for this, but I don't see it. It seems to mock the whole jury and sentencing process to me.

That being said, on January 17, 2017 President Obama commuted the sentences of or pardoned 273 criminals. According to the White House website, three of those people were in Idaho. Two were serving sentences for drug related crimes and 1 for embezzling money.

Pardon information below released by the White House


Carrie Ann Burris – Idaho Falls, ID
Offense: Conspiracy to import 50 grams or more of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine (District of New Mexico)
Sentence: Time served (114 days); five years' supervised release (November 15, 2007)


Mitchell Ray Campbell – Twin Falls, ID

Offense: Distribution of cocaine (four counts); making a false income tax return (four counts) (District of Idaho)
Sentence: Three years’ imprisonment; three years’ special parole (December 12, 1985)
Offense: Distributing cocaine and codeine (two counts); felon in possession of a firearm (District of Idaho)
Sentence: Four years' imprisonment; six years’ special parole (consecutive) (June 4, 1986)


Kim Kathleen Drake, fka Kim Hahn and Kim Otto – Pocatello, ID

Offense: Bank embezzlement (District of Idaho)
Sentence: One month of imprisonment; five years' supervised release, conditioned upon three months’ home confinement; $500 fine; $10,944.37 restitution (November 23, 1999)