BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Idaho public schools chief Tom Luna says he can't go anywhere without being grilled about his "Students Come First" laws limiting union bargaining, promoting merit pay and providing laptops for high school kids. Michael Lanza, the head of the "Vote No on Propositions 1, 2 and 3" effort, knows the feeling. He gets hit up for information by prospective voters in supermarket check-outs and Halloween trick-or-treating. Observers of the $6 million-combined campaigns both for and against Luna's overhaul say the scorched-earth rhetoric accompanying them leaves little room for common ground, regardless of how voters decide Tuesday.