Skin cancer is something that will affect one out of five Americans by the time they reach age 70. In southern Idaho, there are a number of clinics that perform routine skin screenings for those that have concerns.

Obviously, as the Coronavirus pandemic continues to not show signs of leveling off as far as new cases, many health clinics have postponed these types of complimentary screenings as a means to slow the spread of COVID-19 until later in the year.

Personally, I phoned St. Luke's Dermatology weeks ago to schedule an appointment to have a sun spot below my right wrist looked at. It doesn't appear to show signs of being cancerous yet, but I just wanted to get an opinion. I was told I had to wait for at least a month, as the department wasn't seeing patients on a non-emergency basis.

Skincancer.org reports that when detected early, the survival rate for most types of cancer involving the skin is very high. That's why it's imperative to get an examination done as soon as you believe something doesn't look right.

Idaho Skin Center Surgery, in Boise, has postponed its May screenings due to COVID-19, but a staffer told me over the phone they will be following through with their September screenings. The initial exam costs nothing.

In Burley, the Idaho Skin Institute is taking names for a list they are compiling for those interested in having free screenings done. I added my name to that list Wednesday morning. A staffer there told me that they are shooting for June to start the exams back up again.

Through a little searching online, you can also find several other area clinics conducting the free tests as well, you might just have to wait a few weeks. If you feel your situation constitutes an emergency, you should contact an area dermatologist to find out how you can be seen quicker.

Skincancer.org states that approximately two people die from skin cancer in the U.S. every hour on average.

Spencer Platt, Getty Images

Having more than five severe sunburns in a life time increases risk, according to Skincancer.org. 

Joe Raedle, Getty Images

Free screenings are expected to start back up again as early as June, 2020, at some area clinics. 

Joe Raedle, Getty Images
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