I drove by the pumps at the Twin Falls Walmart and spotted the change.  The price for unleaded regular fuel was up eight cents from the previous morning.  From Wednesday morning until Wednesday afternoon it had climbed six cents.  Apparently, the additional two pennies had been tacked on before the day ended.   I looked at the pump prices at a couple of other stations before arriving at work.  I didn’t really see any serious changes elsewhere.  The qualifying statement should be, yet.

As I write this, Brent Crude flirted with $120 a barrel before settling back a few dollars by late morning.

Friends around the country are sharing stories about big spikes in diesel and gasoline costs.  One fellow told me yesterday he was at a station in Southern California and the place was out of gas.  People may soon be rushing to top off before the next price increase.

I bought gas this past weekend at $3.37.9 a gallon for unleaded regular.  I had a 20 cent a gallon discount on my grocery card. I filled up and realized I may never again pay that price again during my lifetime.

Throughout my life, I’ve lived through almost a half dozen energy crises.  Each one came to an end and the price dropped considerably to a manageable level.  Experience should tell me we’ll see the same result but I’m not so sure.

The people who control American energy policy keep telling us this is an opportunity to make a wholesale change with what they call renewables.  They see the high prices for gasoline as aiding their cause.  If there’s a silver lining, most of them will be unemployed at the beginning of next year.

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