The show is called Derry Girls and the second season was released this month on Netflix. It follows a group of friends from a Catholic school in Northern Ireland during the 1990s.  As bombings take place around the children, they go about their lives like a lot of teens. They stress over what to wear to school dances, about boys and try their best to be cool. Failure is the usual outcome.

Caution:  The language is often filthy.  From teenagers. Not that any of us believe our children are always on perfect behavior.

Remember the Hank Kimball character on Green Acres?  Now give him an Irish accent.

The girls (and a boy cousin) come from dysfunctional homes in a dysfunctional country during a dysfunctional time.  And the show might be the funniest thing I’ve ever watched.

Now, my conservative friends won’t tune in Netflix and it’s the only way most of us in America can see the program.  I suspect there will be DVDs released.  I’ve learned you can purchase Netflix for a day and binge watch a favorite show (it’s how I kept up with Longmire), then cancel the service.

What I like about Derry Girls, and it was a week after viewing season two I realized this, is it’s an allegorical tale.  In the midst of a civil war life goes on and people begin to learn they can not only survive but still dream of a better world.  And you can find unity among friends.

Oh, and there is an uncle on the show.  His name is Colm.  He’s played by an Irish comedian.  The guy nails every insufferable relative in your family.  Remember the Hank Kimball character on Green Acres?  Now give him an Irish accent.