Twice in two days I saw a truck with building codes markings.  Here in Twin Falls.  Not that this is like seeing a rare bird or a fish believed extinct.  I share the story because I’ve never actually seen a city building codes truck before.  On Tuesday I saw a truck at the intersection of Eastland Drive and Kimberly Road.  Wednesday I saw a vehicle at a development off Grandview Drive on the north side.  Seeing the trucks is a sign of a building boom we didn’t think would survive Covid-19.

A story from KMVT-TV last week explained houses are flipping in three to five days.  This is similar, if not even faster, than before the pandemic.  If you’re a builder, these are good times.

With our steady growth it’s possible a portion of the political power will remain in the Magic Valley.

The Idaho economy is resilient because of its agricultural base.  People eat.  Even during bad times.  We’ve got a massive new processing facility opening across the river.  Hundreds of well-paying jobs are promised.  A similar type of operation is possible in Idaho Falls.  Which means a fairly even recovery is guaranteed statewide.

We’ll soon have census numbers.  Twin Falls County Republican Party Chairman Steve Millington predicts a state population well in excess of 1.8 million people.  More than a third will live in the Treasure Valley, although.  With our steady growth it’s possible a portion of the political power will remain in the Magic Valley.

The challenge for the new metropolitan area is to keep growing and keep diversifying an economy in a city not directly on the Interstate.  An additional bridge over the river could remedy the issue by offering traffic better access to I-84.  I know, I know.  We may not see it in our lifetimes but it would surely better balance future representation.