California is the butt of many jokes in Idaho.  The perception often is of a place where people are completely out of touch with the rest of America (or any coastal state for that matter can meet the same suspicion).  I was a kid when I heard my first reference to “La-La Land”.  Then every once in a while I come across a story and it shows people there have some common traits with the rest of us.

Earlier this week I shared a thought with Idaho Lt. Governor Janice McGeachin.  Most people want to be left alone.  They don’t bother others and they don’t like being bothered and, yet.  In the time we live it seems someone or something is constantly trying to mess with our lives.  Government, telemarketers and cable companies come to mind.  Especially government.

Remember the old line about signing in triplicate?  It may not quite be that obvious but people have had enough.  Especially after the restrictions that followed the arrival of Covid-19.  Today, I came across this link to the Washington Post.  Plans to restore mask mandates in Southern California are meeting strong headwinds.  A second story from the same newspaper drops hints the White House is aware of public opinion.  Going into mid-term elections, the President’s Party can read the tea leaves.  Pandemic fatigue could become pandemic rage.

We’re seeing it in Idaho.  Our same Lt. Governor told me there were at least 15-hundred people at a demonstration Monday in Meridian.  Outside St. Luke’s, where the hospital is telling workers if they don’t get a COVID-19 vaccine they can expect to lose their jobs.  Others peg the crowd size at several thousand.  Many of those don’t work for any hospital.  They simply showed up to vent their own anger.

It has been a long time since the public has flexed so many muscles.  It feels good!

See How School Cafeteria Meals Have Changed Over the Past 100 Years

Using government and news reports, Stacker has traced the history of cafeteria meals from their inception to the present day, with data from news and government reports. Read on to see how various legal acts, food trends, and budget cuts have changed what kids are getting on their trays.