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Major retailers do something equivalent to war gaming.  For instance, if we lose a supply chain, where can we find another?

This comes to mind after reading this link from a well known news outfit in neighboring Utah (it's among the best in the country).  People have been rushing to big box stores and cleaning out toilet paper and some other supplies they may not really need if they can't leave home for two weeks.  Now, we would all hate to run out of toilet paper (it's happened briefly to all of us) but there are other more critical items you should consider.  

In my definition, panic implies looting and rioting in the streets.  Or the Black Friday rush!

The media hype about the coronavirus is driving people to make some near panicked decisions.  I won't say panic.  In my definition, panic implies looting and rioting in the streets.  Or the Black Friday rush!

Getting back to supply chains.  A few days ago I wrote about the lack of a brand of cat food I buy.  The store where I shop explained the supplier couldn't even get a shipment.  Then something interesting happened.  I walked into the store a few days later and there were cases of the same brand name, however.  The labels are a different color.  The cans are a bit smaller but there are more cans in the case.

This is food I feed mornings to the cats that live here at our studios (outside, not inside).

In less than two weeks this most well-known of big box stores, the world's largest retailer, has found another source for stocking pet food shelves.  Why?  Because some very smart people in the corporate structure have long had such contingency plans in place.  Because they want our business.  And they've got mine.