This is my third year of involvement with a live Memorial Day program at the Wilson Theater in Rupert.  It’s a great honor to be involved.  It’s also a test of my emotional range.  Memorial Day isn’t a happy celebration like we see Independence Day and Thanksgiving, although.  I remind you the Gold Star families grieve those days as well because of the empty seats at the tables.

In my grade school there were many children who had given a close family member to ensure liberty at home and freedom abroad.

I’ve been involved with the family of Sgt. Chris Workman at events over the last four years, the last three with the live show.  They are wonderful people and, yet.  There is a massive hole in their lives and it’s never going away.

Few families today know this experience.  When I was a boy it was a much more common wound and a painful sign of endurance.  We were taught growing up “Freedom isn’t free!”  In my grade school there were many children who had given a close family member to ensure liberty at home and freedom abroad.  I lived in a small town.  The population was between 2,500 and 3,000.

Across the street from my school was a large monument.  It honored the dead from two world wars.  Many of the last names matched the names of classmates.

So, today, it was gratifying to see young people at our show.  Very young people.  Learning the biographies and names of people who paid the ultimate price the young may know life requires sacrifice.