I think I’ve mentioned I’ve seen a wolf in the wild just once.  It was very shy and went charging away as soon as it spotted me.  I’ve also mentioned I used to take my daughter and niece to a zoo where there was a pack of red wolves.  You could watch them from inside an observation bunker through large windows.  They had been acclimated to people staring at them through glass and ignored the viewers.  They did typical canine things, which is to say the played and slept.  A lot with the latter.

The environmentalists don’t experience the financial loss.  If I came to your business and punctured the tires on your delivery truck, you wouldn’t be pleased.

My zoo experience is how most people have encountered wolves but I understand a lot of people in Idaho have grown frustrated with the packs.  Ranchers and farmers blame wolves for depredation of livestock.  I’ve heard arguments both pro and con.  While not every carcass may be the result of an attack by a pack, I believe we need to take the stock owners concerns to heart.

The environmentalists don’t experience the financial loss.  If I came to your business and punctured the tires on your delivery truck, you wouldn’t be pleased.  It’s easy to be noble about wolves when it’s the other guy’s livelihood at stake.

The Idaho Capital Sun is a newly launched site.  Staffed by experienced Idaho journalists.  A writer named Jacob Fischler explains at this link there are people surprised the Biden White House has been quiet on the hunting of wolves.  I’m sure it’s on Biden’s agenda but not his most pressing concern.  If you’re a rancher, the new President will get there at some point and it’s probably not going to be good for ranching.

If you could check out the Capital Sun’s Facebook page on the story, you’ll find in the comments a lot of people are talking past each other.

 

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