Twin Falls area law enforcement is reporting that Twin Falls drivers have been blowing past school busses with flashing red lights.

On one day alone this week, there were six incidents involving motorists not yielding to school busses. Luckily there were no reported injuries. Not only is this a jerk move, but it's also dangerous. Wherever you are going, you have the extra two minutes it takes to stop and wait for a handful of kids to onboard or offload at a bus stop.

As a refresher, we lifted some information from the Idaho State Drivers Manual that outlines when you do (and don't) have to stop for flashing red lights on a bus.

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You have to stop when you are behind the bus.

When you are behind a bus and the lights start flashing yellow, that's your warning that you are about ready to stop. Even if you are in a situation where you could otherwise legally and safely pass the bus, once the lights flash red, you are required by law to stop and wait behind the bus.

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You have to stop when you confront a bus traveling in the opposite direction

When traveling in the opposite direction, you must yield and come to a stop when you come upon a bus with red lights flashing. It's very likely that children will need to cross in front of you. Even after the children have safely crossed the street, you have to remain stopped until the bus driver has turned off the bus's red lights and retracted the stop sign.

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IDT.GOV
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Here's when don't have to stop for a school bus with flashing red lights

If you are traveling on a highway with four or more lanes with two lanes are going in each direction, you don't have to stop if you are driving in the opposite direction of the bus. Vehicles traveling in the same direction as the bus are still required to stop, regardless of whether they are directly behind the bus or in the passing lane.

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Stacker used data from the 2020 County Health Rankings to rank every state's average life expectancy from lowest to highest. The 2020 County Health Rankings values were calculated using mortality counts from the 2016-2018 National Center for Health Statistics. The U.S. Census 2019 American Community Survey and America's Health Rankings Senior Report 2019 data were also used to provide demographics on the senior population of each state and the state's rank on senior health care, respectively.

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