Twin Falls is projected to see its population grow by nearly 3,000 people this year.  The figure pales in comparison to Meridian.  Last year, an estimated 8,500 people moved there.  The population of Idaho is booming.  The population of the Treasure Valley is like the Big Bang. 

Many people in rural communities are pleased with the status quo and like wide open spaces.  Still, it bodes ill when it comes to political power.

We’ve long been looking at the continued urbanization of certain pockets of the state.  Rural communities aren’t growing.  Owyhee, Camas and Franklin Counties aren’t experiencing the massive interest from newcomers.  Many people in rural communities are pleased with the status quo and like wide open spaces.  Still, it bodes ill when it comes to political power.

When new state legislative districts are drawn, even more power is going to shift to Ada and Canyon Counties.  This is why there has been interest, especially in rural Idaho, of adding some new districts.  To offer a few additional seats to outlying regions.

It may also spur some more interest in what so far has been a back burner idea.  Former State Legislator Lee Barron would like to restore an old system where every county had one Senator.  It worked in Idaho’s formative years but was dropped after a court decision.  Barron suggests the federal ruling be challenged by invoking the 10th Amendment.  It could also lead to judicial review and restore the old city/country balance.

I’ve got mixed feelings about the new state law making it more difficult to get signatures on petitions for ballot propositions.  But let me tell you, if the urban areas suddenly decided they wanted a proposition to change priorities for water rights in the state constitution, they now have a much bigger hurdle to clear.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.