Get our free mobile app

This is what I saw when I finished shopping at WinCo.  One recent morning.  Somebody decided to practically park on top of my car.  I could have opened my door but would’ve damaged the paint on the SUV to my left had I tried getting in.

A portion of the parking lot was being resurfaced but shortly after 5:00 o’clock on Sunday morning, the place was nearly empty and there were hundreds of parking spaces.  I pulled into a parking space and made sure I wasn’t near anyone else.  When I came out 15 minutes later I found this mess.

I jotted down the license plate and model, then went inside.  A cashier made an announcement.  A few minutes later a woman with one item in her cart showed up and asked what was wrong with her car.  “It’s parked sideways and you’re blocking my door,” I explained.  She acted as if I was the one causing the inconvenience.  Without saying a word, she went out and straightened her car, however.  She didn’t bother to move into a spot closer to the store.

When I thanked her she stalked away as if I wasn’t there.  Did I mention she was a woman?

Did you know that the overwhelming number of citations issued in southern Idaho for driving while talking on cell phones are presented to women?  It shouldn’t surprise me.  I was a teenager before I realized my mother and her friends weren’t born with telephone receivers attached to their ears!  Telephones and yapping are hardwired into their chromosomes.  Men are from Mars and women live in bubbles.

What did the woman at WinCo believe I was going to do?  Sit on my hood in the dark and wait for her?  Another question, does anyone know a woman who can finish her shopping in under an hour?  They stand in the middle of an aisle and stare at shelves and are oblivious to blocking people behind them.

Now before you call me a misogynist, not every woman is incapable of driving, parking, and staying off her telephone while behind the wheel.  I know one.  Just one.

LOOK: See how much gasoline cost the year you started driving

To find out more about how has the price of gas changed throughout the years, Stacker ran the numbers on the cost of a gallon of gasoline for each of the last 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released in April 2020), we analyzed the average price for a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for unleaded regular gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including the absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover just how much a gallon was when you first started driving.